Archive for April, 2011

April 26, 2011

VILLAGE VOICE

That it documents rural poverty in the American West without exploiting or sanctifying its subjects would be cause enough for praise. But this doesn’t begin to approach what Alma Har’el pulls off with her hybrid doc knockout “Bombay Beach”

NY MAGAZINE
Tribeca Film Festival’s Breakout Doc Director is Alma Har’el
This year’s Tribeca has an unusually strong documentary lineup, but Bombay Beach, the brilliant debut documentary from Israeli music-video director Alma Har’el, is a standout: Cockeyed and stylized, as poetic as it is reported.

INDIE WIRE – REVIEW: A (Eric Kohn)

Har’el’s work contains an otherworldly dimension not unlike Gilliam’s oeuvre – both dreamlike and intimately familiar.
HOW WILL IT PLAY? Having steadily gathered buzz since its premiere at the Berlin Film Festival, “Bombay Beach” is poised to land a few distribution offers. In the right hands, it could continue to gain indie accolades and perform well in limited release.

INDIE WIRE – Festival’s must see films

Tribeca Spotlight: Alma Har’el on “Bombay Beach” If you’re at this year’s Tribeca Film Festival chances are you’ve heard people talking about Alma Har’el’s “Bombay Beach.”

” Alma Har’el’s sweeping debut develops a stunning portrait of many lives in motion”

HUFFINGTON POST
“A real find is Bombay Beach… For this character alone Har-el deserves the Irony Award”

TIME OUT NY

10 Best of the Tribeca Film Festival 2011 – “the movie constantly upends all the usual nonfiction tropes”

NY TIMES – TRIBECA’S FILMS TO WATCH

Bombay Beach – “Compounding the film’s eeriness are dreamlike dance numbers performed by the residents.”

NY PRESS

Bombay Beach proves that bits of utterly unique America still exist.

NY MAGAZINE

25 films to watch in Tribeca: “The unabashedly stylized film pairs intimate access with staged dance sequences, and plays like an odd American folk song — ”

INDIE WIRE – SPOUT – Official Indie Wire blog Network

“wonderful, remarkable and irresistible way of presenting strange truth through hyperreal execution”
” a documentary that is as much MTV as PBS,”
” an awesomely fresh piece of cinema.”

VARIETY

“But among industry auds, many see the fest’s documentary offerings as the most interesting element of its lineup.
Docs that have turned heads already include “Bombay Beach,”
“intriguingly non-standard doc”

WALL STREET JOURNAL

5 Recomended films to see this year in Tribeca: “One of the more distinctive documentary perspectives on display at a festival with a strong nonfiction component,”

HAMMER TO NAIL – Indie wire official blog

Bombay Beach is a tremendously moving piece of cinema—human scale, intimate and warm—with gorgeous cinematography by Har’el, and tender and playful dance sequences choreographed by Paula Present, a long-time collaborator of the director.

VIMMOZ

Bombay Beach- Currently a genuine hit at the Tribeca Film Fest, Alma Har’el’s hauntingly gorgeous “Bombay Beach” really is as astounding as everyone says. It cannot be missed, and is a true turning point in how we see documentary film. It’s going to be a milestone. See it at Tribeca first!

DVD TALK

Alma Har’el’s Bombay Beach mixes documentary naturalism and observation with artful peculiarity and an offhandedly surreal quality.
I’ve never seen a film quite like it. This is a compliment
Some may question the purity of Bombay Beach, and sure, the stylization can have moments of falsity. But for goodness’ sake, when was the last documentary that was this beautiful to look at? Most importantly, every frame conveys the essence of the place, and the spirit of these people. They are flawed, some of them quite deeply. But they live and breath, on that screen and off it, and Har’el treats them, in spite of those flaws, with respect and even a dash of reverence. Afterwards, you can’t get them out of your head. This is an extraordinary film.

WALL STREET JOURNAL – STEVE DOLLAR

She’ll definitely piss off the documentary-with-a-capital-D crowd, and that’s what I like about Alma Ha’rel and Bombay Beach. Conventionally minded viewers may balk at the scenes, which were rehearsed and staged, but it’s a lot more rewarding to go with the film’s casually meta, sympathetic flow. It’s an American beauty.

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